conduct


conduct
conduct n *behavior, deportment
Analogous words: act, deed, *action: demeanor, mien, deportment, *bearing
conduct vb
1 escort, convoy, *accompany, attend, chaperon
Analogous words: *guide, lead: convey, transmit, *carry
2 Conduct, manage, control, direct are comparable when they mean to use one's skill, authority, or other powers in order to lead, guide, command, or dominate persons or things.
Conduct may imply the act of an agent who is both the leader and the person responsible for the acts and achievements of a group having a common end or goal
{

conduct an orchestra

}
{

the minister conducts the prayer meetings

}
{

Douglas conducted conferences and studies which led to a reorganization of the Stock Exchange— Current Biog.

}
but often the idea of leadership is lost or obscured and the stress is placed on a carrying on by all or by many of the participants
{

debates, conducted seriously with a view to ascertaining the truth, could be of great value— Russell

}
{

it was judged desirable for him to see how affairs were conducted in the United States— Heiser

}
Manage usually implies the handling, manipulating, or maneuvering of a person or persons or a thing or things so as to bring about a response or submission to one's wishes or attempts to use, guide, lead, or command
{

he manages the sailboat admirably

}
{

he cannot manage himself, so how can he be expected to manage others

}
{

manage a refractory child

}
{

the boy . . . could not yet manage his "r's" and "th's" aright— Kipling

}
{

the first condition for an artist in glass is to know how to manage blue— Henry Adams

}
{

now do you leave this affair in my hands. Only tell me which woman it is and I will manage the affair— Buck

}
But manage is also often used to imply the action of one who is in authority and charged with the handling of the details of a business or industry or of one of its departments or of any complex or intricate system or organization
{

he manages a theater

}
{

manage the financial affairs of a company

}
{

the delight she would take in managing a real house, not in any sense as its drudge, but magnificently as its mistress— Dell

}
{

manage a chain of restaurants

}
Control stresses the idea of authoritative guidance and suggests a keeping within set or desired bounds (as of accuracy, efficiency, propriety, or discipline); it implies a regulating or a restraining often by getting or keeping the upper hand
{

no attempt was made ... to control by public authority the production and distribution of wealth— Dickinson

}
{

in order to make its highways most useful, the business traffic upon them must be controlledJustice Holmes

}
{

he started things moving and then was caught up in the repercussions of the movement. He mounted an act as if it were a horse, found himself unable to control it— Cloete

}
Sometimes, however, control implies little more than domination or the complete subjection of the dominated person or thing to one's will
{

he has learned to control himself

}
{

the struggle between two strong- willed women to control one weak-willed man is the usual motive of the French drama in the nineteenth century— Henry Adams

}
{

pirates at one time practically controlled the coasts of Florida— Amer. Guide Series: Fla.

}
Direct (see also COMMAND, DIRECT 1, DIRECT 2) implies a regulation of the activities (as of a group of persons) or of the course or courses to be followed; it carries no suggestion of a desire or aim to dominate, but of an intent or purpose to keep the persons or things involved straight, well organized, or properly administered
{

the president and trustees direct the affairs of the institution

}
{

the architect directed the building of the bank

}
{

direct American taste and mold the genius of the young republic— Brooks

}
Analogous words: supervise, oversee (see corresponding nouns at OVERSIGHT): *govern, rule: engineer, pilot, steer, lead (see GUIDE vb): operate, work, function (see ACT vb)
2 demean, deport, *behave, comport, acquit, quit

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • conduct — con·duct / kän ˌdəkt/ n 1 a: the act, manner, or process of carrying on or managing his conduct of the case was negligent b: an act or omission to act a crime is that conduct which is defined as criminal Louisiana Revised Statutes 2 …   Law dictionary

  • Conduct — Con duct (k[o^]n d[u^]kt), n. [LL. conductus defense, escort, fr. L. conductus, p. p. of conducere. See {Conduce}, and cf. {Conduit}.] 1. The act or method of conducting; guidance; management. [1913 Webster] Christianity has humanized the conduct …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • conduct — CONDÚCT, conducte, s.n. Formaţie anatomică cu aspect de canal sau de tub. – Din germ. Kondukt. Trimis de LauraGellner, 30.07.2004. Sursa: DEX 98  CONDÚCT s. (anat.) canal, duct, tub. (conduct auditiv extern.) Trimis de siveco, 05.08.2004. Sursa …   Dicționar Român

  • conduct — [n1] administration care, carrying on*, channels, charge, control, direction, execution, guidance, handling, intendance, leadership, management, manipulation, organization, oversight, plan, policy, posture, red tape*, regimen, regulation, rule,… …   New thesaurus

  • Conduct — Con*duct (k[o^]n*d[u^]kt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Conducted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Conducting}.] [See {Conduct}, n.] 1. To lead, or guide; to escort; to attend. [1913 Webster] I can conduct you, lady, to a low But loyal cottage, where you may be safe …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • conduct — ► NOUN 1) the manner in which a person behaves. 2) management or direction: the conduct of foreign affairs. ► VERB 1) organize and carry out. 2) direct the performance of (a piece of music or an orchestra or choir). 3) guide to or around a place …   English terms dictionary

  • conduct — [kän′dukt΄, kän′dəkt; ] for v. [ kən dukt′] n. [< L conductus, pp. of conducere: see CONDUCE] 1. Rare the act of leading; guidance 2. the process or way of managing or directing; management; handling 3. the way that one acts; behavior;… …   English World dictionary

  • Conduct — Con*duct , v. i. 1. To act as a conductor (as of heat, electricity, etc.); to carry. [1913 Webster] 2. To conduct one s self; to behave. [U. S.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Conduct — may refer to: Behavior a personal behavior, a way of acting and showing one s behaviour using hand gestures to direct Action (philosophy), in relation to moral or ethical precepts Conducting a musical ensemble See also Misconduct Conductor… …   Wikipedia

  • Conduct — Conduct, lat., Geleit; feierlicher Leichenzug. Conducta. span., Sendung von Gold und Silber aus den span. amerikan. Bergwerken an die Küste unter starker Bedeckung. Conducteur (Kongdüctöhr), Führer, der specielle Leiter der Arbeiten bei Bauten;… …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.